Diabetic Ulcers

The diabetic patient can develop a foot ulcer spontaneously; also, in the event that a wound occurs for other reasons, they are notoriously difficult to heal. Furthermore, the risk of infections is increased in a diabetic person due to the reduction in blood supply to the wound bed. Five to 7% of all diabetic patients have a foot ulcer, and almost 25% diabetics develop a foot ulcer in their lifetime.  A diabetic foot ulcer is a critical event in the life of a diabetic patient signifying serious health issues and overall well being. Early wound specialist intervention is key to the prevention and management of this potentially life-changing illness. The diabetic patient often develops neuropathy affecting sensory-motor and autonomic nerves. This often leads to diabetic foot wounds being overlooked until such time that they become saturated with exudate and become infected, and the patient notes a malodor. Prevention is, therefore, much better than cure.

  • Wound Care Surgeons
  • Wound Care Surgeons
  • Wound Care Surgeons
  • Wound Care Surgeons